Series

Santa Fe Indian School Yearbooks, 1927-2017

This collection of yearbooks and early newsletters from the Library of Santa Fe Indian School covers the years 1927-1928, 1932-1936, 1944, 1947-1948, 1952-1962, and 1979-2017. SFIS students created most of the content for the newsletters and yearbooks. Topics range from sports, student production at campus farms of the early years, club activities including 4-H and literary clubs, and travel by students for participation in art exhibitions. Photographs show students, student groups, and views of the campus's early buildings and student artwork.

 

The title and format of the yearbook varies; in early years, newsletters describing student activities were often issued seasonally and the late spring issue of that academic year's newsletter series served as the yearbook. Titles of the Santa Fe Indian School yearbooks and newsletters include Teguayo, named from the Tewa language, and Sandpainter, a title adopted during the years the school was located on the Albuquerque campus. Research strengths of the collection include family history, continuity and changes in school curriculum and student activities over time, and the difference in school mission and operations in the eras before and after the Indian Self Determination Act (1975).

 

History of the Santa Fe Indian Industrial School and Santa Fe Indian School: SFIIS operated as part of the early government Indian boarding school system, opening at the site of the current campus in 1890, and operated there into 1962. In 1962 SFIIS closed, and operations transferred to the Albuquerque Indian School. From 1962 to 1981 the campus of the SFIIS was used for the Institute of American Indian Arts, which today has its own separate campus in Santa Fe. In 1976-1977, the All Indian Pueblo Council (now the All Pueblo Council of Governors) was able to gain control of operation of the Albuquerque Indian School, under the Indian Self Determination and Educational Assistance Act of 1975. In 1981, the operations of the AIS were transferred to the campus of the Santa Fe Indian Industrial School, which now became known as the Santa Fe Indian School (SFIS), a Bureau of Indian Education funded school under tribal control, overseen by a Native Board of Trustees.

 

Images from this collection from the Santa Fe Indian School's Library Archives are made available online at the Indigenous Digital Archive for research. They may not be used for commercial purposes.

 

This collection was digitized and made accessible online by a grant to the Santa Fe Indian School from the New Mexico Historical Records Advisory Board as part of their program to improve preservation and access to historical records of New Mexico. These funds were made available through the New Mexico Legislature and the National Historical Publications & Records Commission (NHPRC).

Logo of New Mexico State Records Center and Archives Commission of Public Records Logo of National Historical Publications & Records Commission

 

References:

 

 

Albuquerque Indian School Yearbooks and Related Ephemera, 1914-1978

This collection of yearbooks and related ephemera of the Albuquerque Indian School consists of 28 yearbooks from the years 1929-1978, noninclusive, plus related ephemera such as the school's creative writing and literary society publications, 1914-1920 and 1969-1975. These extremely rare materials have been preserved in private collections and now are made available for research. AIS students created most of the content. The ephemera includes AIS Lincoln Literary Society Meeting Agendas, 1914-1920; the Commencement and Christmas Catada programs from 1916; Escape Literary Magazine, 1971-1976; Isleta Elementary School Yearbooks, 1987, 1989, and 1991; Arrow (BIA Creative Writing Project Booklets), 1969-1974; and Ramah Tsa’aszi Quarterly Magazine issues from 1974-1975.

 

Research strengths of the collection include family history, continuity and changes in school curriculum and student activities over time, and the difference in school mission and operations in the eras before and after the reforms under Collier in the 1930s under the Indian New Deal; the Indian Termination period of federal Indian policy of the mid 1940s to the mid 1960s, and the Indian Self Determination Act of 1975.

 

The History of Albuquerque Indian School: The Albuquerque Indian Industrial School began in 1881. It was initially a school contracted with a church, as indicated by an 1884 Inspectors' Report. This report also recommended that the government immediately cancel the contract and take over operation of the school, due to finding egregiously deficient conditions maintained for the children by the church. (The inspector noted that this school had the appearance of one of those run by Missionary Boards merely to profit from the contract.) In 1976-1977, under the Indian Self Determination and Educational Assistance Act of 1975, the All Indian Pueblo Council (now the All Pueblo Council of Governors) was able to gain control of operation of the Albuquerque Indian School. Four years later, in 1981, operations of the Albuquerque Indian School were transferred to the Santa Fe Indian School campus, and in the 1980s most buildings of AIS campus were demolished. One notable exception, constructed in 1931, is Building 232, with foundations and flooring built by students and designed by a teacher and member of Isleta Pueblo, Joe Padilla. Now Building 232 has been renovated and since 2013 is the site of the Native American Community Academy, a charter public school of the Albuquerque School System, and is also across the street from the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, an organization of all 19 Pueblo tribes which includes a museum, performance space, teaching garden, and library and archives.

 

Images in this collection come from the private collection of Professor Theodore Jojola (Isleta Pueblo), a Distinguished Professor and Regents’ Professor of the University of New Mexico, and are made available online at the Indigenous Digital Archive for research. They may not be used for commercial purposes.

 

The documents were amassed from private collections given to Dr. Jojola for safekeeping and preservation.  Among the donors are his parents (Isleta, Joe L. Jojola and Juanita Papuyo, class of 1937) , Katherine Augustine (Paguate, class of 1946),  Ramona Ayer (Oneida/Delaware, AIS Clerk, 1950-1972, married to Max Ayer,  AIS Boys' Advisor and Industrial Arts Teacher, 1948-1971),  and Josephine Williams (Isleta, AIS Secretary, married to Fred Williams, AIS Principal, c. 1950).

 

This collection was digitized and made accessible online by a grant to the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture and the Museum of New Mexico Foundation in partnership with Professor Theodore Jojola from the New Mexico Historical Records Advisory Board as part of their program to improve preservation and access to historical records of New Mexico. These funds were made available through the New Mexico Legislature and the National Historical Publications & Records Commission (NHPRC).

Logo of New Mexico State Records Center and Archives Commission of Public Records Logo of National Historical Publications & Records Commission

 

 

 

References:

 

Superintendents' Annual Reports from Field Jurisdictions, 1907-1938 (M-1011)

 

Series may still have items loading into the current site.

M-1011

M-1070

M-1304

M-1473

M-941

PLB

T-21

T-58